Career mapping for career planning

It seems that there are generally two kinds of career mapping.…

Building on Talent Management trends

Six weeks into 2016 and we're seeing a sharp increase in HR decision-makers ready to take the positive steps needed to take on the Talent Management trends we were seeing  last year. Trend #1 - The expectations of a Talent Management system in terms if its accessibility, interface and experience have risen dramatically.…

How to performance manage the career consumer

We've seen the rise of the so-called 'career consumer' who is perhaps more demanding in terms of their workplace development. As such, managing their performance can be a challenge. We believe that by changing managers’ and employees’ approach to performance management can make a difference.…

Succession Planning within the new Talent model - 5 things to think about

In our blog last week, Professor Nick Kemsley, outlined trends in how talented people are viewing their careers and their interactions with their employers.…

Talent Consumerisation - what does it mean for succession planning?

In our blog this week, we take a look at the impact that the consumerisation of talent is having - or may need to have - on our the succession planning activities of an organisation. With the growth of the career portfolio organisations need to align their succession planning approaches far more to how talent thinks about careers and to move away from how HR thinks about process.…

Talent Consumerisation - what does it mean for Performance Management?

In other blogs we have looked at the rise of Talent Consumerisation. But what does this mean for some of the most important talent management activities and processes? In this first blog of a series, we look at the impact on Performance Management - and the shift to more continuous performance management.…

The Consumerisation of Talent

In these times of increasing employee choice, Generation Z and the ‘portfolio career’, do we think about the top talent – and those with the key skills we need – as consumers? Do our managers? Do we tailor our engagement programs, develop career and succession plans to reflect their needs, make feedback, growth and performance conversations a way of life and develop an ‘offer’ that appeals to them? Are we ready for the consumerisation of talent? Recent research by the Henley Business School Centre for HR Excellence suggests not… Professor Nick Kemsley, Co-Director of the Centre for HR Excellence at Henley Business School and Director at Head Light, shares the findings of this research, the trends and what this means for HR in a series of three videos. A shift is emerging in employee behaviour In the first video, Professor Nick Kemsley draws on the research from Henley Business School and highlights how, when you draw together the latest workplace and employee trends, a shift can be seen both in the attitude towards work by talented employees and the relationship with employers. He suggests that people with the skills which are in demand hold a highly powerful position. He challenges organisations to start to think differently about its talented people – and how we talk, work and engage with them. The emergence of the Talent Consumer  In the second video, Professor Nick Kemsley talks about what these trends and emerging new behaviours, might mean for talent management. He suggests that employees and potential employees are beginning to act like consumers – like career consumers – and exhibit many of the behaviours that we exhibit as consumers of products and services. As such, what can we learn from our marketing colleagues? A change in thinking and action is needed  In the final video, Professor Nick Kemsley flags that the current organisational response to these trends is somewhat patchy. He suggests that the shift required will move us away from some of the current thinking and towards to a more discretionary relationship between an employer and an employee. This requires developing a proper employee value proposition, a re-focus on line managers as talent managers and a better understanding of how our employees feel about work, their needs and whether those needs are being satisfied. If you would like to keep in touch regarding our latest thinking and developments in Talent Management software, then do register to receive our newsletter.…

Improving Talent Management by learning from Marketing

We believe that HR teams can look at improving Talent Management in their organisations by borrowing five techniques from marketing. Think of your employees as consumers of the career you offer – keeping them engaged will keep them loyal.  Aim to understand and meet their needs - just as your organisation attempts to meet the needs of your customers. Your marketing colleagues don’t think of your customers as one homogenous group - and know that one-size does not fit all, so why is Talent Management often approached in this way? Marketing teams gather data about consumer behaviour, they’ll segment the audience, develop an enticing proposition and they’ll target specific products and offers to defined customer groups, put in place retention programs and analyse data coming back to them.  How does this play out when we talk of talent as consumers?…

Generation Z - Talent Management

Managing Gen Z talent is said to present different challenges from managing other so-called ‘generations’; the career portfolio, a stronger desire for work-life balance, development planning. How does this impact the traditional talent management model?…

The Consumerisation of Talent - an event hosted by Head Light

If we think about the people in our organisations as career consumers, what does this mean for the way in which we manage, develop and progress them?  With the growth of the ‘portfolio career’ and employee choice, our employees are looking for more tailored, customised and mutually-beneficial work experiences. And, with this in mind, we’re asking what impact does this ‘consumerisation’ have on our talent management practices and strategy?…

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